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Graduate Program

Program Summary (as of Fall 2014)
Degrees Offered
   Hydrology M.S., Ph.D.
Enrollment
   Ph.D. 16
   Master's 31
   Female 50%
   International 3%
Participating Staff
   Academic Faculty 25
   Research Faculty 2

This page provides information on HSE Degrees, Admission, and Curriculum.

You can also access the CSM Graduate School online application.

Degrees:

The Hydrologic Science and Engineering Program currently offers the following degrees:

  • Combined Baccalaureate & Masters of Science, Hydrology
  • Masters of Science, Hydrology (thesis or non-thesis option)
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Hydrology

To see the HSE Graduate Handbook, click here.

Combined B.S./M.S. Program

Any Mines undergraduate is eligible to apply for the combined program in hydrology. Students must maintain a B average in their undergraduate program and declare interest in their mid-sophomore or beginning junior year by contacting the hydrology program. A formal graduate application is completed by first semester senior year. Although the GRE is waived for combined applicants, students must submit three letters of recommendation along with their application. Students must meet all master’s degree requirements as listed below, however six 400-level credits from the undergraduate program may be double counted for the master’s degree. Please see the Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Programs sections in the Graduate and Undergraduate Bulletins for additional information.


Master of Science (M.S.)

To achieve the Master of Science (M.S.) degree, students may elect the non-thesis option, based exclusively upon coursework and a project report, or the thesis option. The thesis option is comprised of coursework in combination with individual laboratory, modeling and/or field research performed under the guidance of a faculty advisor and presented in a written thesis approved by the student’s committee.

  • M.S. Non-Thesis Option: 36 total credit hours, consisting of coursework (30 hours), and Independent Study (six hours) working on a research project with HSE faculty.
  • M.S. Thesis Option: 30 total credit hours, consisting of coursework (24 hours), and research (six hours). Students must also write and orally defend a research thesis.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

To achieve the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree, students are expected to complete a combination of coursework and original research, under the guidance of a faculty advisor and doctoral committee, that culminates in a significant scholarly contribution to a specialized field in hydrologic sciences or engineering. Full-time enrollment is expected and leads to the greatest success, although part-time enrollment may be allowed under special circumstances. All doctoral students must complete two semesters of full-time, on-campus residency.

Ph.D.: 72 total credit hours, consisting of coursework (at least 36 hours post baccalaureate) and research (at least 24 hours). Up to 36 hours of transfer credit can be applied to the degree from a previous M.S. degree related to hydrology. Students are expected to complete a combination of coursework and original research, under the guidance of a faculty advisor and Doctoral committee, that culminates in a significant scholarly contribution to a specialized field in hydrologic sciences or engineering. Full-time enrollment is expected and leads to the greatest success, although part-time enrollment may be allowed under special circumstances. All doctoral students must complete the full-time, on-campus residency requirements described in the general section of the Graduate Bulletin. Students must successfully complete written and oral qualifying examinations, write and defend a dissertation proposal, write and defend a doctoral dissertation, and are expected to submit the dissertation work for publication in scholarly journals.


Admission:

Currently, students will apply to the hydrology program through the Graduate School and be assigned to the HSE participating department of the student's HSE advisor. Participating departments including Chemistry and Geochemistry, Engineering, Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE), Geology and Geological Engineering (GGE), Geophysical Engineering, Mining Engineering (ME), and Petroleum Engineering (PE).


Curriculum:

Sudents are required to take courses from a "core list" of 4 classes, and a number of electives. A minor degree is not required for HSE graduate degrees.

Required HSE Classes:

  • Ground Water Engineering (GEGN 466, taught in the fall by Singha)
  • Surface Water Hydrology (GEGN 582, taught in the fall by Maxwell)
  • Contaminant Fate and Transport (either CEEN 583 for surface-water emphasis, taught in the fall by Cohen, or CEEN 584 for groundwater emphasis, taught in the spring by Illangasekare)
  • Principles of Environmental Chemistry (CEEN 550*, taught in the fall by Higgins)

*Students who plan to incorporate hydrochemistry into their research may elect to replace CEEN 550 with a two-course combination that includes an aqueous inorganic chemistry course (GEGN/CHGC 509, fall) and an aqueous environmental organic chemistry course (CEEN/CHGC 551, spring).

Electives:

Course Name Cr. Semester Instructor
CEEN 461 Fundamentals of Ecology 3 Fall Ryan
CEEN 471 Water Supply Engineering 3 Spring Cath
CEEN 472 Onset Water Reclamation 3 Spring Contact Tim V
CEEN 511 Unsaturated Soil Mechanics 3 Spring Lu
CEEN 512 Soil Behavior 3 Fall Contact Tim V
CEEN 515 Hillslope Hydrology and Stability 3 Fall Lu
CEEN/CHGC 551 Environmental Organic Chemistry 3 Spring Higgins
CEEN 560 Molecular Microbial Ecology and the Environment 3 Fall Spear
CEEN 562 Applied Geomicrobiology 3 Spring Sharp
CEEN 575 Hazardous Waste Site Remediation 3 Spring Contact Tim V
CEEN 580 Environmental Pollution: Sources, Characterization, Transport and Fate 3 Fall McCray
CEEN 581 Watershed Systems Analysis 3 Spring Hogue
CEEN 582 Mathematical Modeling of Environmental Systems 3 Alt. Year Illangasekare
CEEN 611 Multiphase Contaminant Transport 3 Fall Illangasekare
CHGC/GEGN 509 Aqueous Geochemistry 3 Fall Voelker
GEGN 470 Ground Water Engineering Design 3 Spring Benson
GEGN 498 Fluid Mechanics for Hydrology 2 Fall Maxwell
GEGN 532 Geological Data Analysis 3 Spring Singha
GEGN 573 Site Investigation 3 Spring Santi
GEGN 575 Applications of GIS 3 Spring Zhou
GEGN 581 Analytical Hydrology 3 Fall Benson
GEGN 583 Mathematical Modeling of Groundwater Systems 3 Spring Benson
GEGN 584 Field Methods in Hydrology 3 Fall Singha
GEGN 585 Hydrochemical Modeling 3 Alt. Spring Sitchler
GEOL 540 Isotope Geochemistry and Geochronology 3 Alt. Spring Humphrey/Kuiper
GEOL 545 Intro to Remote Sensing 3 Contact Tim V
GPGN 509 Physical and Chemical Processes in Rock, Soils, and Fluids 3 Fall Revil
GPGN 574 Ground Water Geophysics 3 Spring Revil
EBGN 510** Natural Resource Economics 3 Fall Eggert
CEEN 592** Environmental Law 3 Spring Battalora
LAIS 588** Water Politics and Policy 3 Fall Amery

**EBGN 510, CEEN 592, LAIS 588: No more than two of these courses may be taken as part of a the 24 hour course requirement for an thesis MS, and no more than 3 of these courses may be taken as part of the 30 hour course requirement for a non-thesis MS.

Students applying to the Hydrology program must have a baccalaureate degree in a science or engineering discipline as well as the following coursework:

  • College calculus (two semesters)
  • Differential equations (one semester)
  • College physics (one semester)
  • College chemistry (two semesters)
  • College statistics (one semester)
  • Fluid mechanics (one semester)


Some prerequisites may be completed in the first semesters of the student’s graduate program. Applicants should have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.2 for admission to the program. GREs are required for admission.

Financial Assistance

Applicants seeking financial support should indicate such within the application for admission. Support may be in the form of teaching assistantships (TA), research assistantships (RA) or fellowships. Generally, these awards are reserved for students pursuing a research-based program. To be considered for financial support, students should apply by December 15.

TAs are generally offered by March 15 for the next academic year, so are not usually available beginning with the spring semester. RAs are offered by individual faculty to students whom they expect will contribute quickly to a particular funded research project. Applicants interested in RAs should contact directly the faculty members whose research interests parallel their own.